A Life of Leisure

defendneworleans:

David Byrne on his visit to New Orleans.  Read Part 1, Part 2 and Part 3. 
Photo by David Byrne

defendneworleans:

David Byrne on his visit to New Orleans.  Read Part 1Part 2 and Part 3

Photo by David Byrne

Why every American needs to visit New Orleans

been saying this for years…

The Language of New Orleans in One Word: Gumbo | @pritheworld

“In America, there might be better gastronomic destinations than New Orleans, but there is no place more uniquely wonderful. So I would say New Orleans. With the best restaurants in New York, you’ll find something similar to it in Paris or Copenhagen or Chicago. But there is no place like New Orleans. So it’s a must see city because there’s no explaining it, no describing it. You can’t compare it to anything. So, far and away New Orleans.”

—   Anthony Bourdain (via jlangenbeck)

(via cajunboy)

A Look Into America's Fastest Growing City - Forbes

After Katrina, much like the stronger oak trees, came new industries, new businesses, new people, and new purpose into New Orleans, creating a rebirth that has made a significant economic impact.  The story that followed the events of Hurricane Katrina was not just one of resilience, but one of opportunity, renewal, and influence.

theatlantic:

In New Orleans, High Hopes for the Perfect NBA Team Name

The very day New Orleans Saints owner Tom Benson was introduced as the new owner of the New Orleans Hornets back in April, he mentioned that he wanted to make one long-overdue change to the NBA franchise the city inherited from Charlotte, North Carolina, a decade ago. He wanted to change the team’s name, he said, to something that actually means New Orleans. “The ‘Hornets,’” he said, “doesn’t mean anything.’”
Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: New Orleans Hornets]

In a perfect world, they’d just trade names with the Jazz.

Here’s hoping it’s the Zombies.

theatlantic:

In New Orleans, High Hopes for the Perfect NBA Team Name

The very day New Orleans Saints owner Tom Benson was introduced as the new owner of the New Orleans Hornets back in April, he mentioned that he wanted to make one long-overdue change to the NBA franchise the city inherited from Charlotte, North Carolina, a decade ago. He wanted to change the team’s name, he said, to something that actually means New Orleans. “The ‘Hornets,’” he said, “doesn’t mean anything.’”

Read more at The Atlantic Cities. [Image: New Orleans Hornets]

In a perfect world, they’d just trade names with the Jazz.

Here’s hoping it’s the Zombies.

Sometimes, when a place is so special, it stops being a destination and evolves into a home. And home—a “where” that both feeds and urges you to feed back, a distinctness denied to so many Americans who’ve grown up in an amorphous nebula of strip malls, fast food, big boxes, MySpace, Facebook, Twitter, a world of social interaction and anywhere businesses that can be transplanted everywhere, and thus exists nowhere—is something many Americans of my generation have missed. Home is what so many New Orleans transplants came to rebuild, but before they knew it they were on the cutting edge of green architecture, education policy and the local food movement. They were keeping what makes this city special, and waterproofing its soul all at once. Home wasn’t rebuilt. It was reinvented.

When I left New Orleans—which took me two weeks of false starts and stops, I loved it so hard—and the orange lights of the city blurred into the graveyards and the humid air rushed into my mouth through open car windows, a billboard from a realtor loomed over the highway: “Home matters most.”

Yeah. You right.

—   Adam Karlin (via cajunboy)

The Sunday Building Project – Now social! « Spacing Montreal

You are walking down a New Orleans street, say, in the Marigny.

a) A man waves at you from his front porch.

b) A passerby asks how you’re doing.

c) A group of children are dancing in the music that spills out of their house, and their parents all look up, nod, and smile.

d) Some kids are having drinks and don’t mind if you join them, bum a cigarette, and play their instruments.

e) All of the above.

DEFEND NEW ORLEANS: In the 1870s, Charles Darwin was the theme of a downright deranged Mardi Gras parade

defendneworleans:

One of the coolest sites on the internet is Tulane University’s Louisiana Research Collection of Mardi Gras costume and float designs. Here, thousands upon thousands of pieces of concept art detail parade pageantry dating back to the mid-1800s.

In the Tulane collection, you can find…